January Workshop Planned!

Posted by on Dec 21, 2017 in Henry County Stories | 0 comments

January Workshop Planned!

Come learn a Ewe-sful new skill at the Historical Society!

The Historical Society is preparing for an exciting new program in January…we are pleased to announce that Pam Shull will be teaching a wool spinning workshop at our museum on January 13, 2018, from 1-4:30 p.m.  Ms. Shull has served as an historic interpreter at Spring Mill State Park for 10 years.  She has a wealth of knowledge about spinning and extensive experience as an instructor.  The workshop will include a brief history of spinning, examples of various spinning tools from simple hand spindles to full spinning wheels, and a tutorial on how to make your very own yarn using a hand spindle.  Instead of using a complex wheel, attendees will rely on gravity and careful manipulation of a simple spindle rod to stretch and twist raw wool into fine, strong strands. This is the oldest and simplest method of spinning ever devised, and anyone can learn it with a little practice and guidance!

The $35 participation fee includes a $20 instructor’s fee and a $15 materials fee.  Pam is generously donating all of the proceeds to the Museum.  Each attendee receives a hand-crafted wooden spindle and a selection of wool, which they will spin in class and then take home.  Craftsman and carpenter Everett Rance made each spindle for our program.  And, for those interested in owning a period-accurate spinning wheel, Everett and Barry Edstene have also refurbished several small ones, which are being sold to benefit the Museum.  These are not historic artifacts, but they are accurate recreations of 19th century spinning wheels.

This is a great opportunity to learn a new skill while supporting the Henry County Historical Society!  If this program is successful, we have more planned for 2018.  If you are interested, please call the Henry County Historical Society at 765-529-4028 to reserve your spot as attendance is limited to 10 guests.  Payment can be submitted using the PayPal feature on the homepage of our website, www.henrycountyhs.org (click “Donation” and note Spinning Workshop in the comments).  If there is enough interest (or if the weather is inclement), we will be running a second session on January 20, 2018.  We hope to see many of you here to learn something new as well as historic!

Read More

2017 Door Prize Winner!

Posted by on Dec 18, 2017 in Henry County Stories | 0 comments

2017 Door Prize Winner!

Congratulations!  Ms. Diane Wendell was our final end-of-year door prize winner for 2017.  Our final puzzle pictures for December all came from our Henry County schools collection, which will be our 2018 exhibit, Henry County Schools, Then and Now.  Anyone who guessed at the puzzle pictures *or* liked them on Facebook or on our website was entered into the door prize drawings all year long.  Keep that in mind for 2018!  Our online trivia fun will be My Name is Henry County, based on the Darrel Radford poem of the same name.  The focus will be on our portraiture collection, both on display and not on display, of Henry Countians.  The first few weeks will be easy as they are all located on the main floor of the Museum so come up and study the faces and names and be entered in the monthly drawing.

Ms. Wendell is a Life Member of the Historical Society, so, in lieu of adding a year onto her lifetime membership, she chose to accept a Museum t-shirt as a token of our appreciation.

Read More

Ulysses “Bud” Bush Plaque is Home!

Posted by on Dec 18, 2017 in Henry County Stories | 0 comments

Ulysses “Bud” Bush Plaque is Home!

In recent years, no one person has done as much for Henry County genealogy/family history than Ulysses “Bud” Bush.  Bud saved old courthouse ledgers full of early county history and brought them to the Museum for safekeeping.  He then transcribed the hard-to-read handwriting, typing it up and binding it into books or publishing it on his website, www.HCGS.net, to share with anyone tied to Henry County.  He studied all Henry County cemeteries and visited each one of them, compiling records of headstones and burials and history of the land.  He abstracted old newspaper articles, pulling family names and making the information searchable on his website.  Thanks to the efforts of Mark Sean Orr and many others, Bud’s memory lives on at Memorial Park as a bench overlooking the Blue River Valley.  A beautiful kelly green plaque now resides at the Museum in a most appropriate place, the Clarence H. Smith Genealogy Library, a perfect reminder of Bud’s hard work, and the hard work of genealogists before him, and of those who realized the importance of his work for future generations!

Bud’s plaque is just to the right of the window, situated among the courthouse ledgers and the every-name card catalog index.

Read More

What A Day!

Posted by on Dec 11, 2017 in Henry County Stories | 0 comments

What A Day!

Our Christmas Open House was Sunday, December 10, and what a day it was!  General Grose’s mansion was filled with the lovely voices of the Raintree Children’s Choir directed by Mrs. Judy Hubbard and assisted by her husband, Bill.  Wonderful entertainment!  While some enjoyed holiday refreshments and others took brief tours, Mrs. Penny Sitler played hauntingly beautiful Christmas music on our Jesse French piano.  To have the Museum filled with such warm-hearted spirit was truly a joy to behold.  Please enjoy a couple short video clips at the end of this post!

Read More

FINAL PUZZLE PICTURES OF 2017~ANSWERS!

Posted by on Dec 10, 2017 in Henry County Stories | 0 comments

FINAL PUZZLE PICTURES OF 2017~ANSWERS!

Day #1: Bell from the Ellenbarger School in New Lisbon. Donated by Colleen Arcoine in 1957.

Day #2: Window weight from “The Castle,” donated by Fred Mann.

Day #3: Graduating class of 1876 (2nd from New Castle High School): Flora Bond, Wm. C. Bond, George Scott, Minnie Boor.

Day #4: Pencil box of J.H. Lindsey, uncle of Charles McKenzie, long-time caretaker of the Museum.

Day #5: World Book Encyclopedia set.

Day #6: Macintosh Apple computer, ca. 1985.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read More