Historically Speaking

This is an archive of weekly columns written by Darrel Radford, Board member of The Henry County Historical Society, and published each Saturday in The Courier-Times, New Castle’s daily newspaper.

Maxwell Addition Open to the Public

Posted by on May 14, 2015 in Historically Speaking | 2 comments

Maxwell Addition Open to the Public

Saturday, April 25th was an exciting day at the Henry County Historical Society. Not only did we hold our annual meeting, but it was the day of our Grand Opening for the new Maxwell Exhibit. A crowd of approximately ninety members and guests attended the event. A ribbon cutting ceremony was held with several of our local dignitaries and Jenny Washburn, the daughter of Howard Joyner who donated the 1911 Maxwell automobile to the society. We are so pleased with the wonderful new addition and encourage all our friends and members to stop in to see it soon.

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Remembering Howard Joyner

Posted by on Oct 31, 2014 in Historically Speaking | 0 comments

Remembering Howard Joyner

Howard E. Joyner, 85, of Lafayette passed away Monday, October 27, 2014. He was born February 20, 1929 in New Castle to the late William H. ‘Chic’ Joyner and Beatrice Carpenter Joyner. Howard graduated from New Castle High School in 1947 and attended Purdue University. After college he joined his father and brother in the family construction business W.H.Joyner & Sons. In February 1957 Howard married Arbutice ‘Bootie’ Todd. Bootie passed away April 6, 1996. Howard married Barbara Blair in May 27, 2000. She passed away October 15 of this year. Howard also was preceded in death by his...

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Remembering Jim Reno

Posted by on Sep 6, 2014 in Historically Speaking | 0 comments

Darrel Radford / C-T photo The Gentle Man Jim Reno’s sculpture of The Gentle Man is in the Henry County Historical Society Museum. Posted: Friday, June 13, 2014 6:18 pm By DARREL RADFORD For The Courier-Times | 0 comments A 1998 San Antonio Express-News story captured a most memorable unveiling. It reported how television cameras surrounded horse owner Peggy Tweedy as she got her first look at a new statue. The nervous sculptor watched nearby. Tweedy walked completely around the life-size bronze image. Then, the newspaper reported, Tweedy smiled and said, “That’s my horse.” The horse...

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Mt. Lawn memories make the heart race

Posted by on Sep 6, 2014 in Historically Speaking | 0 comments

By DARREL RADFORD HISTORICALLY SPEAKING | 0 comments Famous band leaders Jimmy Dorsey and Sammy Kaye played there. Chrysler workers who came here from Kentucky once lived there. The “Rushville Rocket” Tony Stewart honed his skills there. Mt. Lawn has revved up Henry County in more ways than one since Doc Sweigart built the unique, pear-shaped race track. The announcement earlier this month that stock car racing would be canceled at the facility for 2014 created more than just a ripple of sadness in the local community. But what a ride it’s been up until this point. Archives at the Henry...

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Lincoln-Kennedy simularities odd and eerie

Posted by on Sep 6, 2014 in Historically Speaking | 0 comments

By DARREL RADFORD For the Courier-Times This week, America observed two major historical dates. Tuesday was the 150th anniversary of President Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg address. Friday marked the 50th year since President John F. Kennedy’s assassination. As local history enthusiasts are probably aware, there are several interesting, even odd similarities that forever link Lincoln and Kennedy. Some of these are well-known, others are obscure. Here are a few: n Both Presidents were shot in the back of the head, on the Friday before a major holiday, while seated beside their...

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Museum is hidden Henry County jewel

Posted by on Sep 6, 2014 in Historically Speaking | 0 comments

By DARREL RADFORD Historically Speaking The year was 1870. Less than 100 years after America won its independence. Just 54 years after Indiana became a state. Only 48 years after a place called New Castle and formation of a county named after a man who famously said “Give me liberty or give me death.” That year, a stately new home was built for a Civil War general and local attorney – William Grose. Gen. Grose was definitely not a give-orders-and let-others-do-the-fighting kind of general. He was actively involved in some very recognizable Civil War battles. Shiloh....

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